Good People:
Ariel Brown, PhD
The Emotional PPE Project

Ariel Brown is the Board President and Founder of The Emotional PPE Project, an organization that connects health care workers in need with licensed mental health professionals who can help. Ariel is also an Associate Director, Medical Science at Sage Therapeutics. She is a neuroscientist who has done research on the brain in ADHD and bipolar disorder and helped develop the first drug approved for postpartum depression. She started The Emotional PPE Project merely by asking a friend “how can I help?” and by tapping into the goodwill of her personal and professional network.

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Ariel Brown, PhD
The Emotional PPE Project

Good People:
Aixa Beauchamp
Latino Legacy Fund

Aixa Beauchamp has worked in philanthropy for over twenty years. She is the president of the Latino Legacy Fund, which she co-founded in 2013 as a partnership between Latino philanthropists, Hispanics in Philanthropy, and The Boston Foundation. The work of the Fund has taken on a new sense of urgency with COVID, as Chelsea, the cultural anchor of the Latino community and home to thousands of immigrants, became the epicenter of the pandemic in Massachusetts. In a recent Boston Globe Op-Ed, Aixa argued that philanthropic funds too often overlook communities like Chelsea. “We would like to believe we can bring about a fair process of funding, but long-held unconscious and implicit biases, cultural differences, decision-making power, and unequal access to funders make this impossible.” 

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Aixa Beauchamp
Latino Legacy Fund

Good People:
Jocelyn Harmon
Co-founder, BlackHer

Jocelyn Harmon is a co-founder of BlackHer, a new media company built for the 24 million Black women in the U.S. The online content, provided in BlackHer Weekly and BlackHer Guides, educates and inspires powerful Black women to take action for personal and collective economic and political change. To beat Trump, Jocelyn believes the Democratic Party needs to muster the humility to follow the lead of people who know the landscape, and to expand the electorate by investing in local Black groups now and forever. Read more Good People:
Jocelyn Harmon
Co-founder, BlackHer

Good People:
Ms. Ivy

Elaine Ivy is a middle school teacher in Malden, MA, one of the most diverse communities in the state, where over 60 languages are spoken in the schools. She describes her students as funny and sensitive, touched by poverty, mental illness and domestic abuse, children of business owners, refugees, parolees, and war. Now that school is closed, she’s doing her best to stay connected to all of them. Ms. Ivy keeps her spirits high by thinking back to favorite pre-COVID moments with her students, chief among them, presiding over a Gingerbread House Baking Competition.

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Ms. Ivy

Good People:
Charles Daniels

Good People for the Resistance is a monthly interview with people who give me hope. Today, meet Charles Daniels, who with his wife Samantha co-founded Fathers’ Uplift, an organization that helps absent fathers become part of their children’s lives, and provides counseling to children growing up without their fathers.

In a few short years, Charles has gone from an entry-level social work job to a 2019 Obama Foundation Fellow who’s earned national recognition for his work, appearing on CNN and Good Morning America. Last year, President Obama sent Charles a Father’s Day Twitter greeting, announcing, “This man has a brilliant solution to helping fathers reconnect with their kids.”

How’s Charles do it? Through a lot of hard work and, over the years, internalizing the teachings of his childhood hero, Mr. Rogers.

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Charles Daniels

Good People
Natalie Guo

Good People for the Resistance is a monthly interview with people who give me hope. This week, meet Harvard Medical School student and Soros Fellow for New Americans, Natalie Guo. While eating breakfast the morning of March 15, Natalie had an idea: A way to restore restaurant jobs to the most vulnerable workers, and at the same time provide nutritious meals to hospital workers at the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. By dinnertime that same day, Natalie had arranged for two of Boston’s most renowned chefs – Tracy Chang and Ken Oringer — to deliver meals to emergency room and ICU staff at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital. 

Three weeks later, Natalie’s new organization, Off Their Plate, has served over 6,000 meals to COVID frontline workers across Boston, New York, San Francisco, L.A. and Pittsburgh, and has provided $30,000+ in wages to restaurant workers she has kept in a job. 

Natalie’s goal is to stay ahead of the predicted “peaks” in each city, a Herculean, and at times a heartbreakingly impossible task. Each of us can help. I urge you to contribute what you can.

NOTE: I typically report Good People for the Resistance in an interview format. However, because of the immediacy. and intensity of Natalie’s work right now, I decided not to ask her to spend an hour on the phone for an interview. Rather, I pieced together a Q&A using notes from a Zoom conversation that a small group of us had with Natalie last weekend, in which she briefed us on her work and funding needs, documents Natalie and her team have created outlining their business plan, and an interview Natalie did with the Soros Foundation last Spring. Read more Good People
Natalie Guo

Good People:
Angela Duckworth

Psychologist Angela Duckworth is a New York Times best-selling author, a McArthur Genius Grant winner, and her Ted talk has over 10-million views. She left a high-paying consulting job to teach 7th graders in a tough NYC public school. There, she observed that “grit” – not necessarily IQ – determined which students succeeded. Angela talked to Good News about the importance of grit and how to measure it, why she thinks Trump has it, and what she would say to him if they met.  Read more Good People:
Angela Duckworth

Good People:
Erica Etelson

Good People for the Resistance is a monthly interview with people who give me hope. This week, meet Berkeley, CA-based writer Erica Etelson. In her new book, Beyond Contempt: How Liberals Can Communicate Across the Great Divide, Etelson takes on the gargantuan task of urging liberals to stop demonizing Trump, and start speaking to his supporters with curiosity and respect.

As a person experiencing severe “contempt fatigue,” I was excited to learn of Erica’s book. Reading it, my feelings vacillated between contempt for Trump and his supporters, guilt that I feel so much contempt,  and gratitude that Erica wrote this book. Learn why Trump-related contempt is like Doritos — it makes us feel good for a moment, but that feeling just doesn’t last. 

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Erica Etelson

Good People:
Filmmaker Beth Dolan

Good People for the Resistance is a twice-monthly interview with people who give me hope. This week, meet Los Angeles-based filmmaker Beth Dolan, who is in the final stages of  finishing a documentary, Stranger At Home: The Untold Story of Military Mental Health. After working on TV situation comedies, NBC movies-of-the-week, and most recently, Los Beltran, an award-winning Spanish language comedy for Sony/Telemundo, Dolan has turned her attention to elevating awareness of the mental health crisis in the U.S. military.

(Personal note: This post is dedicated to my niece, Sergeant First Class Rosalind Atkins Green, who served 24-years in the military, including a year in combat in Iraq. Ros has taught me much about what it means to be a warrior – in every sense of the word. Years after retiring, she’s still there for any of her soldiers who need her).

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Filmmaker Beth Dolan

Good People:
Enrique Chiu

Good People for the Resistance is a twice-monthly interview with people who give me hope. Today, meet Mexican artist Enrique Chiu, who is painting an enormous “Mural of Brotherhood” on the Mexican side of The Wall.

How’s he do it? With lots of volunteers, from all over the world. Interested in traveling to Tijuana with  a group of Good News readers to help him? Send us an email. Read on to learn more ... Read more Good People:
Enrique Chiu